Teaching Children How to Sew

We are coming to the end of our Spring Break it’s been a productive break. The girls and I have been making Easter crafts, Kayden started making her own Barbie clothes that didn’t require sewing. Today I adventured down the path of teaching children how to sew.

Over the past few weeks, I have been sewing more and the girls always seem interested. I decided to show them the basics of sewing, if they continue to show interest then I’ll let them do a few more projects.

Teaching Children How to Sew

I believe the easiest way to teach children how to sew is by using felt and simple shapes. It’s how I learned as a little girl, so I thought why not give it a shot. We used the following items for our sewing project today.

Felt
Scissors (just for the adult to cut the felt)
Sewing Thread
Sewing Needles with a Blunt Tip (you can find these at most places that sell sewing items)

Teaching Children How to Sew - Needles

Teaching Children How to Sew cont. .  .

Cut the felt into squares, each child will need 2 squares. Remember when cutting the squares not to make them to big, their little hands aren’t as coordinated as ours. I gave my 8 yr old grand-daughter a 6″ square, and her younger sister who’s 5 a 4″ square. These were perfectly sized for their little hands, they were big enough for them to learn and small enough for them to succeed.

After giving the girls 2 pieces of the felt each I showed them how to thread the needle and how to tie a knot on the end. I didn’t allow them to do it this time, next time I’ll have them do it themselves.

Teaching Children How to Sew - Kayden Checking out her Needle

Teaching Children How to Sew it’s time to start sewing . . .

We were finally ready to start sewing. I explained to them that it’s important to make sure the material stayed lined up while sewing. If not them their pocket wouldn’t be even. Then I showed them that it’s best to start from the underside of their project and poke the needle up. Also had to teach them to they had to pull the thread tight so it wasn’t hanging.

Teaching Children How to Sew - Kayden

After coming up through the bottom of the felt, it was now time to go back through. This is where I also taught them to make sure they keep the stitches close enough together so they don’t have a hole. Each of the girls knew what was next, it was time to poke the needle back up to the top of the felt. They both got it, and back down again. It seemed like they had it, so I told them to keep sewing and when they got to the corner to let me know.

Teaching Children How to Sew - Sewing Away

Teaching Children How to Sew one side done . . .

I allowed them both to work on their projects while I worked on their Beauty and The Beast t-shirt dresses. All three of us in my little crafting corner just a sewing away. It was really a memorable experience and I’ll definitely be tucking this one in my memory bank.

They both finished the first side at about the same time. I then showed them how to do what I refer to as closing the stitch. Basically, it’s like using the backstitch on a sewing machine, but you’re doing it with needle and thread. Kayden the oldest got it and understood why, but Izzy kind of just went along with it.

Teaching Children How to Sew our project continues . . .

Now it was time to do another side, and to again show them how to thread a needle and make the knot at the end. Then back to sewing we all went. After a few minutes, they had that side done too. But not before I hear Izzy saying oppies.

I turned around and saw that instead of going up and down or in and out, she went around the side and down. No biggie I told her it was just a little mistake and I could fix it. That’s why felt and these bigger eyed needles work great for teaching little ones. All I had to do was push the needle back through and show her she was supposed to go up through the bottom.

Teaching Children How to Sew finishing up . . .

They both finished sewing all 3 sides, and I talked about how when you’re sewing you do it on the part of the material that goes on the inside of the project. I showed them their hems and stitches on their pjs so that they had an idea of what I meant. We then turned our pockets right side out. It was so cute seeing their happy faces while giggling over their first sewing project.

We then turned out pockets into cell phone purses. Basically, I cut a strip of the felt long enough for their pocket and had them sew it on the insides of each side of the pocket. They loved that they got to sew more, I had them pose with their phones in their new purses. So stinking cute!!

Teaching Children How to Sew - Kayden's Happy Face

Final thoughts on Teaching Children How to Sew

This was a fun little project that I feel the girls really enjoyed doing. It was small enough for them to handle, but big enough for them at actually learn. When I saw how excited they were when they finished their first sewing project I knew then it would be something we’d continue to do.

I am fortunate enough that I can stay at home with my granddaughters and thankful to the Hubs for giving me the life we live so that I can. It’s a blessing that I am a grandma that gets to see her grandchildren on a daily basis. I remember seeing my grandma once or maybe twice a year. We are making memories one day at a time.

Teaching Children How to Sew - Finished Project Izzys

If you enjoyed this article . . .

you’ll love our other crafting with kids projects. We also just started our month-long Easter series which will have crafting projects, home decor ideas, and sewing projects centered around Easter. I will also be sharing some of my Cricut projects and some awesome Fun Finds products too. Stick around and follow us on the social media outlets.

If you’re a grandma how often do you see your grandchildren? If you’re a parent how often do you take your children to see their grandparents? As a parent do you do little projects like this with your kiddies?

Teaching Children How to Sew - Izzys Purse Teaching Children How to Sew - Finished Project Kayden

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